Whale in the Door

A Community Unites to Protect BC's Howe Sound

Videos

Watching videos is an entertaining and heart-opening way to learn more about Howe Sound/Atl’kitsem. There are many videos listed in the Resource section of Whale in the Door. Here are some new ones.

Behind the Sill 375 feet down, Howe Sound March 27, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=6JNihBHIaYsDURdy&u=/watch%3Fv%3D5r8TMS01Wbk%26feature%3Dem-share_video_user

Ever wonder what’s going on in the waters of Howe Sound/Atl’kitsem? Citizen scientist, John Buchanan, thinks about this every day. That’s why he created Howey – a series of underwater cameras that allow him to get up close and record the natural wonders there. “One surprise to me,” John told me, “was the fast current down at that depth behind the sill..Life is very busy down there.”

How to Pronounce Skwxwú7mesh 

This video by Khelsilem Rivers, a Squamish Nation councillor and language teacher, will teach you how to pronounce the name for his people and his language.

Howe Sound Ballet

A brand new video from Bob Turner as he goes out in his kayak to find some surprising goings-on in his “ocean front yard. ” Bob, with his underwater camera, makes some important discoveries about the Sound. It’s his most artistic video to date and I learned a lot about the spectacular ballet that goes on in the Sound.

Who Are Howe Sound’s Heroes?

My Sea to Sky (www.myseatosky.org) is a grassroots organization concerned about the impacts of Woodfibre LNG and the proposed Gravel Mine in Howe Sound. They have been working tirelessly to protect Howe Sound/Atl’kitsem. In this brand new video they do it with humour.

Pink Salmon on the Stawamus River:

– a remarkable video shot by geologist/filmmaker Bob Turner in September 2017. At the foot of the Stawamus Chief in shallow pools of the Stawamus River, this underwater video allows you to watch the spawning of Pink Salmon. The males develop a humpback when they spawn; the females keep their sleek shape. This is a millions of years old ritual that takes place all over the coast of BC. Watch for the Dipper, one of my favourite birds as she takes a salmon egg from the river bottom. Salmon feed everything – the bear, the gulls, the forests.

Anchovy!

Another great short film by Bob Turner, this one on anchovy, a keystone species in Atl’kitsem/Howe Sound. The film features the giant schools of anchovy that appeared in 2015 and 2016 in Atl’kitsem/Howe Sound and the resulting flush of whales, sea lions, seals, and salmon that feast on them. This is part of Bob’s ongoing efforts to collect and share the stories of Wild Nature in Atl’kitsem/Howe Sound. I  asked Bob about 2017 returns and he said: “I am working on an Anchovy 2017 film. It was a giant return, the strongest of the three years. But I only found one school of juveniles, and didn’t hear anyone else talking about them (but I am going to check), so 2018 uncertain.”